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It looks like this The first mark is from Aluminia.Many of the works of Royal Copenhagen's artists were also produced under the Aluminia name--Actually Aluminia had purchased Royal Copenhagen (Est.1863) in 1882, and produced under both names until 1969, when the Aluminia name was dropped.

She sought to improve Denmark’s economy and founded factories around the country to promote domestic growth and international trade. Royal Copenhagen first made dinnerware and vases with blue-and-white motifs inspired by Chinese porcelain, then the rage in aristocratic Europe. Apart from its classic patterns, Royal Copenhagen has adapted to the changing styles of time and appeals to many different tastes.

Their prolific body of work includes Rococo-style porcelain statues that incorporate stylistic floral patterns in an Art Nouveau style, as well as modern vases by such noted 20th century Danish ceramists as Axel Salto.

Its celebrated blue-and-white china patterns as well as its famed hallmark depicting the royal crown and three waves—symbolizing the monarch who founded the company and the three major waterways of Denmark—are emblems of master craftsmanship.

Royal Copenhagen was founded in 1775 by Queen Juliane Marie.

Mostly your choice was limited to Carlsberg or Tuborg pils.

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