10 rules to dating my teenage daughter 7 minute dating nyc

10 rules to dating my teenage daughter-75

Over the next week, two of my boys have birthdays that end in “teen.” Today, Jonah stepped fresh and eager into his thirteenth year. I feel like I finally understand why I had to go through the baby and toddler years: This is the reward. Our boys need to know what is absolutely ok, and what is absolutely not.

Next Saturday, Josiah will swagger his way into fifteen. I mean, I love my kids at every stage, but certainly some years nearly killed me. So…I’ve been thinking a lot about these years–and how be the mom they need right now. Some days they just need to figure out what feels right. They may resist rules, but deep down they feel safe when there are clear-cut rules without exceptions. I’m not talking about phony, contrived encouragement ( Our kids are watching us.

Side note #1: As for us–**We have a rule of “clean” entertainment only. God’s love is our motivation, and that is the environment we have raised our kids in.

No swearing or Your teenage son will likely pull away from you physically, and that is normal, albeit painful. Though I did not go into that on each point, it is just a natural part of all we do. If you’ve invested in the early years, then the doors will be open and they will trust and respect you as teenagers too.

Now that my boys are developing into young-version human beings…It’s all making sense. God only knows I’ve messed up enough in every other stage, and I only hope they can forget about my mistakes. Today my son becomes a teenager, and tomorrow he’ll be packing for college (God willing. Between conversations with other moms, plenty of books on the subject, and talking to my boys directly, I have come up with what I think are the eleven most important things… Make them clear and consistent, and have absolute consequences in place for when they break rules. Even the quietest ones will open up when given the chance. They get a lot more of an idea about what is right, wrong, good and bad from what you do than what you say. No, you’ll never be perfect, and you can tell your kid that–but don’t use that fact as an excuse to be lame. If you teach them to speak well of others, make sure you do the same. To listen, or discipline.share a joke, or a hug…you need to be in close proximity to your kids.

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